Report: Alex Rodriguez Used Banned PEDs With MLB's Permission In 2007 | Robert Littal Presents BlackSportsOnline

Report: A-Rod Used Banned PEDs With MLB’s Permission In 2007

by Glenn Erby | Posted on Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014
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According to Sports Illustrated, an excerpt from the new book Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis and the Quest to End Baseball’s Steroid Era reveals the suspended slugger used testosterone in 2007 with the consent of Major League Baseball under a special exemption.

Before the 2007 season, Rodriguez asked for permission to use testosterone, which has been banned by baseball since 2003. The (independent program administrator) in ’07 was Bryan W. Smith, a High Point, N.C., physician. (Baseball did not yet have the advisory medical panel.) On Feb. 16, 2007, two days before Rodriguez reported to spring training, Smith granted the exemption, allowing Rodriguez to use testosterone all season.

The exemption was revealed in a transcript of Rodriguez’s fall 2013 grievance hearing. During that proceeding, MLB entered into evidence several exemptions applied for by Rodriguez during his Yankees tenure. In his testimony, MLB chief operating officer Rob Manfred called testosterone “the mother of all anabolics” and said that exemptions for the substance are “very rare,” partly because “some people who have been involved in this field feel that with a young male, healthy young male, the most likely cause of low testosterone requiring this type of therapy would be prior steroid abuse.”

According to the excerpt, Rodriguez was one of only two players granted a TUE for “androgen deficiency medications,” which include testosterone.

Major League Baseball released a statement on the matter.

All decisions regarding whether a player shall receive a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) under the Joint Drug Program are made by the Independent Program Administrator (IPA) in consultation with outside medical experts, with no input by either the Office of the Commissioner or the Players Association. The process is confidentially administered by the IPA, and MLB and the MLBPA are not even made aware of which players applied for TUEs.

The TUE process under the Joint Drug Program is comparable to the process under the World Anti-Doping Code. The standard for receiving a TUE for a medication listed as a performance-enhancing substance is stringent, with only a few such TUEs being issued each year by the IPA. MLB and the MLBPA annually review the TUE process to make sure it meets the most up-to-date standards for the issuance of TUEs.

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I Am A Senior writer for BlackSportsOnline, I own thacover2.com, sports AFICIONADO, degree in Sociology, Waiting On My Moment!


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