Former NFL Players Featured in ESPN Documentary “Broke” | Robert Littal Presents BlackSportsOnline

Former NFL Players Andre Rison and Others Featured in ESPN Documentary “Broke”

by BSO Staff | Posted on Tuesday, June 5th, 2012
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All rookies in every sport should be required to see this documentary. “Broke,” a ESPN documentary directed by Billy Corben, is a part of ESPN “30 for 30 Vol. II” which is scheduled to be released in October.

The documentary “digs into the psychology of men whose competitive nature carries them to victory on the field and ruin off it.” It features retired stars like Keith McCants, Bernie Kosar, Leon Searcy and Andre Rison, as well as commentary from Marvin Miller, the former executive director of the MLB Players Association, Bart Scott of the New York Jets and many others.

Below is a synopsis of the documentary.

According to a 2009 Sports Illustrated article, 60 percent of NBA players are broke within five years of retirement. For 78 percent of NFL players, it takes only three years. Sucked into bad investments, stalked by freeloaders, saddled with medical problems, and naturally prone to showing off, most pro athletes get shocked by harsh economic realities after years of living the high life. Drawing surprisingly vulnerable confessions from retired stars like Jamal Mashburn, Bernie Kosar, and Andre Rison, as well as Marvin Miller, the former executive director of the MLB Players Association, this fascinating documentary digs into the psychology of men whose competitive nature carries them to victory on the field and ruin off it. 

With athletes like Terrell Owens claiming to be broke and former NFL running back Jamal Lewis in court today for a bankruptcy court hearing, this documentary should be a lesson for newly professional athletes on how to manage their money properly.

You don’t want to be another Andre Rison, who declared bankruptcy in 2007 and was indicted by a federal grand jury last year for failure to pay child support charges. Or Keith McCants, who confessed in a 2011 interview that he wished he “never had any money.”

Or another T.O.

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